What is anorexia nervosa?

The Anorexia Nervosa develops from a rigid adherence to a strict diet that involves the reduction of the quantity ‘and quality’ of the foods eaten and sometimes it could develop in a total abolition of meals. The prevalence of anorexia among males is about one tenth compared to the females. The age of onset of the disorder is between 12 and 25 years, with a double peak around 14-18 years. In recent decades cases have been diagnosed to more late onset around 20-30 years. With the progression of the disease, when it is not ‘possible to tolerate the prolonged hunger, binges usually develops. Many people start to force themselves vomit, also abusing on laxatives and / or diuretics. Moreover it could lead to compulsive exercise or fitness sessions in a desperate attempt to continue to control their weight and calories intake. Anorexia affects both the physical and emotional aspects. The anorexic person is underweight, has a distorted image of his body, she often experience an intense fear of gaining weight and use to practice excessive physical activity. It is one of the most severe mental health conditions leading to starvation, serious health problems, and even death. Anorexia can be a disorder that lasts a lifetime, although it is possible to make a full recovery through proper treatment.

What treatment to choose?

The care typically provides psychotherapy and counselling, with the aim of establishing a dialogue on the subject in question. It’s important that the therapist works with a dietician, responsible for teaching the subject as regain a healthy relationship with food. In severe cases when body mass index is under 16, close to a life-threatening situation, hospitalisation is necessary.

What's Bulimia Nervosa?
Bulimia typically affects a majority of women (70% of cases).

Bulimia is also a common disease for men and boys. Although it does not lead to death as in the case of anorexia, digestive and metabolic complications can severely affect the body. It has been linked with suicidal attempts and negative thoughts “obscure” the life of the bulimic subject. If the anorexic patient use denial as major mechanism of defence, the bulimic person instead lives his condition in shame and guilt, seeking help.

The evolution of the disease is chaotic, since characterised by attenuations for prolonged periods of time and by new crises or relapses. Recognise the symptoms, taking them in charge as soon as possible, avoids prolonged suffering.

What treatment to choose?

The care typically provides psychotherapy and counselling, with the aim of establishing a dialogue on the subject in question. It is important that the therapist work with a dietician, responsible for teaching the subject as regain a healthy relationship with food. In severe cases, where it is life-threatening, it is necessary to hospitalization.